centerlogobigAAD logo

enarzh-CNnlfrdehiplrues
Art

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, pundits offered a variety of reasons for its failure: economic, political, military. Few thought to add a fourth, more elusive cause: the regime’s total loss of credibility.

This hard-to-measure process had started in 1956, when Premier Nikita Khrushchev gave his so-called secret speech to party leaders, in which he denounced Josef Stalin’s purges and officially revealed the existence of the gulag prison system. Not long afterward, Boris Pasternak allowed his suppressed novel “Doctor Zhivago” to be published in the West, tearing another hole in the Iron Curtain. Then, in 1962, the literary magazine Novy Mir caused a sensation with a novella set in the gulag by an unknown author named Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn. 

That novella, “A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich,” took the country, and then the world, by storm. In crisp, clear prose, it told the story of a simple man’s day in a labor camp, where he stoically endured endless injustices. It was so incendiary that, when it appeared, many Soviet readers thought that government censorship had been abolished. 

To read more on The New York Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/11/opinion/solzhenitsyn-soviet-union-putin.html

Screen Shot 2018 12 02 at 15.12.22

You may also like to read:

*  A Soldier's Story in Notebooks 

*  Prosecution for Satire

*  The Master of Fear

 

About the Author

AAD REPORTS

AAD REPORTS

AAD REPORTS   Reports, news and opinion from Art-Antiques-Design.com