centerlogobigAAD logo

enarzh-CNnlfrdehiplrues
Antiques

70,000 African elephants appear to have given their hides to the legal global skin trade during the past decade—about twice the number poached for ivory each year.

Screen Shot 2018 01 01 at 18.00.05

Elephant Skin Auctions in Zimbabwe Are Booming—And Legal 

“If you are looking for the toughest of leathers and the sturdiest of boots, elephant is the hide for you, as nothing compares to the strength of a custom elephant cowboy boot.”

So reads the website of the Paul Bond Boot Company, one of the firms that turn the gnarly-patterned hide of Earth’s largest land animals into boots, wallets, belts, suitcases, jackets, golf bags, pool cues, furniture, car and motorcycle seats, gun holsters, and whatever else well-heeled customers may fancy. Better yet, adds Paul Bond, “the tanning options are second to none, with several different textures and colors available.” 

Worldwide, hide exports have held steady or grown during the past decade, far surpassing those in preceding years. In 2007-16, according to CITES data (which are recorded inconsistently), Zimbabwe and South Africa together exported the whole hides of 38,858 elephants plus another 609,000 square feet and 21,504 pounds of skins and leatherwork. At an average 20 square feet per processed hide, these would represent more than 30,000 elephants.

This does not include thousands more pieces and goods that were merely counted, not measured, plus smaller quantities from other countries and any illicit exports. Unless there is considerable overlap in the CITES data, at least 70,000 African elephants appear to have given their hides to the legal global skin trade during the past decade—about twice the number poached for ivory each year.

To read more on National Geographic:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/12/wildlife-watch-zimbabwe-elephant-skins-trade/

Screen Shot 2018 01 01 at 18.00.05

You may also like to read:

*  American Ivory Ban Does Not Address Real Cause

*  Exclusive: footage shows young elephants being captured in Zimbabwe for Chinese zoos

*  The Environmental Investigation Agency Have Some Questions To Answer

*  THE DARK SIDE OF IVORY PROHIBITION

*  Corruption fuelling ivory trade in central Africa

*  The Ivory Ban in the UK, and the Zimbabwe connection

 

About the Author

AAD REPORTS

AAD REPORTS

AAD REPORTS   Reports, news and opinion from Art-Antiques-Design.com